Down The Hatch on Facebook

Down the Hatch co-hosts Dr. Ianessa Humbert and doctoral student Alicia Vose presented their first ever Facebook Live event on October 27th with special guest Vince Clark, Director of Dysphagia Diagnostics with Integra Rehabilitation. Find Down the Hatch on Facebook by following this link! We encourage you to Like the page and to watch the full Facebook Live Halloween edition of Down the Hatch. Enjoy!

Fun Fact: Aly worked for Integra Rehab for her clinical fellowship before coming to join the SSC Lab; Vince is the reason she met Dr. Humbert in the first place. Thanks, Vince, and great job on the podcast!


6 Replies to "Down The Hatch on Facebook"

  • Lisa Murray
    November 4, 2017 (12:38 pm)
    Reply

    I’m halfway through this episode, great discussion! I’m a home health clinician with access to both MBSS and FEES with prior experience doing both types of assessments. I just heard Dr. Humbert point out that MBSS does not show residue as well as FEES and that that is ok as long as the SLP doing the FEES isn’t too conservative. My question is do we know from research whether the residue shown by FEES but not MBSS is or is not a problem for the patient? In other words, do we know from research whether MBSS is missing a clinically relevant aspect of the swallow when it does not pick up the residue or whether FEES is showing us an aspect of the swallow that is normal?

    • Ianessa Humbert
      November 5, 2017 (5:20 pm)
      Reply

      Hi Lisa,
      Great question. I do not know if studies show that SLPs who use FEES are more likely to over diagnose residue as “significant” than if they saw it on fluoro (in the same swallow). I think such a study would require simultaneous FEES+FLUORO and require a SLP practice pattern research question – where clinical judgement is the primary outcome that is tested. It would be intriguing to learn about this, though.

  • Grace Lee
    November 20, 2017 (9:32 pm)
    Reply

    Hi Dr. Vose and Dr. Humbert,

    I love listening to your clinical expertise! It is so refreshing to hear an honest dialogue regarding patient care. My question is why do most aspiration events happen ‘during’ the swallow and not before or after? Is there data from normal swallowing that would provide an explanation or any data from your clinical background to inform us? Thanks!

    • Ianessa Humbert
      November 21, 2017 (2:32 pm)
      Reply

      Hi Grace, thanks for listening and for your question. There is no study that has directly examined the before, during, and/or after question that you have asked, to our knowledge. Ultimately, aspiration can happen before, during, or after the swallow due to the same impairment in the same person. Sure some impairments might be more prone to cause aspiration at a particular period relative to the swallow, but we always recommend focusing on the underlying swallowing pathophysiology … then bolus flow relative to that pathophysiology is secondary. I hope that answers your question.

  • Grace Lee
    December 22, 2017 (7:18 pm)
    Reply

    Hi Dr. Humbert,

    This makes so much sense to me. I will try to alter my thinking to determine the ’cause’ of the aspiration and address issues related to improving that source of dysfunction.
    PS- you are the queen of analogies!

  • Grace Lee
    December 23, 2017 (3:37 am)
    Reply

    Hi Dr. Humbert,

    I saw the brochure to the 2018 DRS meeting:

    http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.dysphagiaresearch.org/resource/resmgr/meeting_files/2018/53317_DRS_2018_Post_Graduate.pdf

    I have 2 questions:

    1. Will the Scientific Paper Presentation titles/topics be released? That would help determine if it aligns with practice.

    2. Given that I am just a clinician, will it be helpful to attend a research-focused conference? I don’t know research and am just a clinician right now. I don’t have a phd and am not sure if I will be looked down on at the conference.


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